Press release №2343
05.07.2021
SPAM AND HOW TO DEAL WITH IT

IN BRIEF

  • Almost one-third of Russians (28%) are aware of what “spam” means (“unsolicited bulk email”, Eng.)
  • About one-third of Russians (29%) receive annoying ads on a daily basis
  • every fourth (24%) receives spam once or several times a week
  • 17%, once a month
  • Spam messages or calls are annoying to most of Russians (63%).

May 11, 2021. VCIOM presents the data of a survey about the Russian opinions on spamming.

Almost one-third of Russians (28%) know what “spam” means (“unsolicited bulk mail”,  Eng.); 14% of respondents consider that it refers to unnecessary information; 5% believe that it means “trash”; 3%, fraud; 3%, ads; 2%, virus. More than one-third of respondents (37%) did not encounter this word before, Most of those who are aware that spam means unsolicited ads are young Russians aged 18-24 (47%) and respondents aged 25-34 (41%), as well as residents of Moscow and St Petersburg  (42%), million-plus cities (41%), people living in cities with a population of 500-950 thousand inhabitants (38%) and respondents with higher and incomplete higher education diplomas  (42%).

Spam has become an essential part of the daily life of Russians: about one-third of Russians (29%) receive annoying ads every day; every fourth (24%) gets spam messages once or several times a week; 17%, once every few months. Slightly less than one–third of Russians (28%) say they have not received spam calls or messages over the recent month.

Annoying ads largely refer to bank services (73%), communication services (35%), health services (34%), legal services (19%), education services (15%), medicines (15%), software programs (12%) and travel services (9%).

Most of Russians (63%) get annoyed when they receive spam calls and messages; 8% do not get annoyed; one-third of Russians (29%) say they are indifferent.

Russian nationwide VCIOM-Sputnik survey was conducted on April 30, 2021. A total of 1,600 of Russians aged 18 and older took part in the survey. Results are based on telephone interviews. Stratified dual-frame random sample based on a complete list of Russian landline and mobile phone numbers was used. The data were weighted according to selection probability and social and demographic characteristics. The margin of error at a 95% confidence level does not exceed 2.5%. In addition to sampling error, minor changes to the wording of questions and different circumstances arising during the fieldwork can introduce bias into the survey.

 

Let us talk about advertising. Today people come across different types of advertising including spam. Are you familiar with the word “spam”?  How would you define spam? (open-ended question, one answer, % of total respondents; answers of at least 2% of respondents) 
  Total respondents Aged 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-59 60 +
Annoying/ unwanted  ads 28 47 41 31 28 11
Unnecessary information 14 18 18 18 14 7
Trash 5 1 5 6 6 7
False information 5 8 6 5 4 5
Fraud 3 6 4 3 3 3
Ads 3 3 6 3 2 1
Virus/ malicious emails 2 0 4 4 2 1
Other 3 2 4 4 3 3
I hear about it for the first time / no answer/ don’t know 37 15 12 26 38 62

 

Let us talk about advertising. Today people come across different types of advertising including spam. Are you familiar with the word “spam”?  How would you define spam? (open-ended question, one answer, % of total respondents х)
  Total respondents Moscow and St Petersburg Million-plus cities 500-950 thousand inhabitants 100—500 thousand Less than 100 thousand Rural area
Annoying/ unwanted  ads 28 42 41 38 31 22 15
Unnecessary information 14 26 12 13 13 13 9
Trash 5 9 7 5 5 4 5
False information 5 2 4 6 5 7 5
Fraud 3 0 2 4 3 4 4
Ads 3 1 4 4 2 3 4
Virus/ malicious emails 2 2 1 1 2 3 3
Other 3 2 3 7 4 3 3
I hear about it for the first time / no answer/ don’t know 37 16 26 22 35 41 52

 

Let us talk about advertising.  Today people come across different types of advertising including spam. Are you familiar with the word “spam”?  How would you define spam? ( open-ended question, one answer, % of total respondents )
  Total respondents Incomplete secondary education Secondary education (school, vocational school) Specialized secondary education  (technical school) Incomplete higher (not less than three years in a higher education institution), higher  education
Annoying/ unwanted  ads 28 28 27 30 42
Unnecessary information 14 15 16 8 7
Trash 5 8 5 7 0
False information 5 5 5 6 3
Fraud 3 4 3 3 9
Ads 3 5 3 2 0
Virus/ malicious emails 2 1 3 3 0
Other 3 6 3 3 0
I hear about it for the first time / no answer/ don’t know 37 28 35 38 39

 

Spam is unsolicited ads sent through email, messengers, social media, text messages or unsolicited calls. Have you received spam calls or messages over the recent month? If so, can your recall how often you received it over the recent month? (closed-ended question, one answer, % of total respondents)
  Total respondents
Almost every day 29
Once or several times a week 24
Once or several times a month 17
I have not received spam calls or messages over the recent month   28
Don’t know 2

 

You say that you have received spam messages or phone calls over the recent month. Can you recall what cervices or products they were about? Choose them from the list. Any number of answers (open-ended question, any number of answers, % of total respondents)
  Total respondents
Bank services (introducing a new card, deposits, etc.) 73
Communication services (new tariffs) 35
Health services 34
Legal services (legal counsellor, legal advice) 19
Education services (courses, workshops, webinars, etc.) 15
Medicines, health products 15
Software, apps 12
Travel services (health resort package, tour package, etc.) 9
Other (specify) 22
I do not remember/ Don’t know 5

 

When your receive spam calls or messages, do you get annoyed, not get annoyed, or are you indifferent? (closed-ended question, one answer, % of total respondents)
  Total respondents
I get annoyed a lot 28
Likely to get annoyed 35
Unlikely to get annoyed 6
Not at all annoyed 2
Indifferent/ I pay no attention 29
Don’t know 0
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