Press release №2217
07.10.2019
VACCINATION: A HOT-BUTTON ISSUE OR AN IMPORTANT MEASURE?

IN BRIEF

  • Most of Russians consider that vaccines are an effective way to protect against diseases and that they do more good than harm (57%)
  • 62% of Russians have been vaccinated: mainly the 18-24-year-olds Russians (87%), residents of cities with a population of 500,000-950,000 inhabitants (66%), less than 100,000 inhabitants (65%) and rural area residents (66%)
  • 36% have never been vaccinated against flu viruses
  • 28% make plans to get vaccinated against flu viruses this year: basically the 18-24-year-olds (48%), respondents aged 60+ (31%) and rural area residents (35%)
  • 58% of Russians are not going to get vaccinated against flu
  • The major reasons behind the refusal are: satisfaction with the state of personal health / confidence that vaccines are not important (29%), doubts that vaccines are effective (23%), concerns about the negative effects on health and immune system (20%)

Fifty-eight percent of Russians do not make plans to get vaccinated against flu this year; the main reason behind that is their satisfaction with the state of personal health.

MOSCOW, October 7, 2019. Russian Public Opinion Research Center (VCIOM) presents the data of a survey devoted to Russian attitudes towards vaccination.

Good or harm?

For most of Russians vaccines are an effective way to combat infections, and they do more good than harm (57%). This opinion is mainly supported by younger respondents aged 18-24 (69%), and respondents aged 60 and over (62%) as well as residents of cities with a population of 100,000-500,000 inhabitants (62%).

Every fifth considers that in general vaccines are useless and do to humans neither bad nor harm (23%). This stance is shared both by inhabitants of large cities with a population of 500,000-950,000 inhabitants (31%) and small cities of less than 100,000 inhabitants (28%).

Get vaccinated or get worried?

Most of Russians have been vaccinated against flu (62%): basically persons aged 18-24 (87%), residents of cities with a population of 500,000-950,000 inhabitants (65%) and rural area residents (66%). The percentage of those who have never been vaccinated is 36%: mostly respondents aged 35-44 (42%), 45-59 (40%), residents of Moscow and St Petersburg (45%), million cities (39%) and cities with a population of 100,000-500,000 inhabitants (38%). This year about one-third of Russians (28%) make plans to get vaccinated against flu viruses: basically Russians aged 18-24 (48%), 60 and over (31%) and rural area residents (35%). More than half of Russians do not make plans to get vaccinated against flu viruses this year (58%); they are predominantly men (61%), residents of large cities Moscow and St Petersburg (65%), million cities (65%), cities with a population of 500,000-950,000 inhabitants (63%), as well as those aged 35-44 (60%) and 45-59 (64%). Reasons behind refusal are as follows:  satisfaction with the state of personal health resulted in a confidence that vaccines are not important (29%), doubt that vaccines are effective (23%), or anxiety related to negative impacts on health and immune system (20%). Every tenth does not trust vaccines (11%). A further 8% have contraindication to vaccination; 6% have not experienced that; 5% hope that they will not get sick without vaccines.   VCIOM-Sputnik survey was conducted on September 27, 2019. The survey involved 1,600 Russians aged 18 and over. The survey was telephone-based and carried out using stratified dual-frame random sample based on a complete list of landline and mobile phone numbers operating in Russia. The data were weighted according to selection probability and social and demographic characteristics. The margin of error at a 95% confidence level does not exceed 2.5%. In addition to sampling error, minor changes in question wording and different circumstances arising during the fieldwork can introduce bias into the survey.

Note: Using materials from the site www.wciom.ru or wciom.com, as well as distributed by VCIOM, the reference to the source (or hyperlink for the electronic media) is obligatory.

  Results of our study
  Ratings
  In focus
  News